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Ancient Greece UNIT for Teachers Illustration

Ancient Greece
Unit Plan

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EARLY GREEKS

CLASSICAL GREECE
- UNIT PLAN

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THE EARLY GREEKS: UNIT OVERVIEW

Donald G. Donn, Corkran Middle School, Maryland, USA
Created during my first year as a teacher. It has some ideas I still use so I left it online.
For new teachers, TSWBAT means "the student will be able to".
Have a great year!



I. Introductory Information

A. Subject: Ancient Greece

B. Grade & Ability level: 6th Grade; easy

C. Unit Title: The Early Greeks

D. Time Frame: 7-15 days

E. Textbook page references are noted throughout this unit. I used several textbooks.
Substitute appropriate pages from the textbook you are using.


II. Overview and Rationale

A. Scope and major concepts

1. This unit covers the early history of Ancient Greece.

2. This unit will include lessons on:

  • The key role of geography in the development of Greece.

  • Athenian democracy and it relationship to our own

  • Ancient Greek culture and the roots of western culture

  • The growth of Athens and Sparta and the Persian Wars.

3. This unit will concentrate on geographic and language arts skills.

4. The Unit will focus on student personal discovery and challenge the student to express their own ideas and beliefs concerning world events.

B. Rationale: This unit is designed for 6th-grade students. The unit will broaden their horizons by showing how decisions made in one country can, and do affect other countries. It will also help prepare students for Maryland State exams by introducing concepts used in Maryland State, and U.S. government. It is designed to increase students map skills by giving them the opportunity to see how geography affects people and history.


III. Objectives (C = Cognitive, A = Affective, P = Psychomotor)
(TSWBAT: The Student will be able to)

  • TSWBAT use map skills to locate Greece, Create, and the Aegean sea on a map(C)

  • TSWBAT discuss and support either side of an argument in a debate given an appropriate subject. (C, A)

  • TSWBAT demonstrate writing skills. (C, P)

  • TSWBAT demonstrate research skills. (C, P)

  • TSWBAT demonstrate presentation skills. (C, P)

  • TSWBAT demonstrate, understand, and use maps, charts and graphs. (C, P)

  • TSWBAT give personal judgments and express values concerning world events. (C, A)

  • TSWBAT broaden their personal horizons through role playing and panel work. (A, P)


IV Evaluation Process

Ways to evaluate:

  1. The student's participation in classroom discussions, debates, completion of assigned homework, and activities will demonstrate the students understanding of the lessons.

  2. The students are given a daily drill question to answer. The students will be graded mostly on effort and attempt to answer.

  3. A directed writing activity will be assigned. The students will be graded on writing skills, and the appropriateness, and content of their work.

  4. A quiz on the chapter will be given. Quiz will be T/F, multiple choice.


V. Subject Matter/Skills Outline

Following is a list of essential thinking skills and related concepts that will be related to each days activities. Each skill will be numbered and this number will be listed at the end of each days subject matter outline. This listing of skills is taken from the Dimensions of Learning handout given by the Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Office of Staff Development, Instructional Leadership


Program

Positive Attitudes and Perceptions

A. Classroom Climate

  • Acceptance

  • Comfort

  • Order

B. Classroom Tasks

  • Value

  • Ability/Resources to perform tasks

  • Clarity

Acquiring and Integrating

A. Declarative Knowledge

  • Construct Meaning

  • Organize

  • Store

B. Procedural Knowledge

  • Construct Models

  • Shape

  • Internalize

Extending and Refining

  1. Directed Teaching of Thinking Skills

  2. Comparing

  3. Classifying

  4. Inducing

  5. Deducing

  6. Analyzing Errors

  7. Constructing Support

  8. Abstracting

  9. Analyzing Perspectives

Meaningful Use of Knowledge

  • Directed Teaching of Dimension

  • 4 Mental Processes

  • Decision Making

  • Investigation

  • Experimental Inquiry

  • Problem Solving

  • Invention

Productive Habits of the Mind

  • Self-regulation

  • Critical thinking

  • Creative Thinking


Lesson #1 Introduction Ancient Greece

Lesson Topic: Introduction

Type of Lesson: Introductory

Lesson Objectives:

  • TSWBAT using proper terminology, identify and describe terms associated with geography.

  • TSWBAT, using proper terminology, locate and name Greece and its surrounding seas on a map.

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Overhead transparency list of terms.

  7. Overhead transparency map of Ancient Greece.

Lesson Background: This is the introductory lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will build on our knowledge of Ancient Civilizations with locations, distance, and topography similarities and differences from Egypt. It will also explore the Grecian economy and why it developed the way it did.

Lesson Procedures:

Drill (5-10 minutes): (Activity #1) the vocabulary words are written on an overhead transparency. Students know to copy these into their notebooks in the vocabulary/drill section.

Motivation/Recall (5 minutes) (Activity #2)

Transition statement: You have just finished your unit on Egypt, now we will be moving across the Mediterranean Sea to look at Greece. Lets look at our map and find Greece. (Have a student come up to the Map and find Greece; give them some assistance if necessary)

Initiatory Activity: (Activity #3) Have students open their textbook to p-329 and study the map of Greece. Have them look for geographic aspects of Greece that they think may be important. Have them compare what they see to Egypt.

EGYPT GREECE
Desert Very wet
One Coast (Mediterranean) Surrounded by Seas (Med, Ionian, Aegean
One solid piece Many peninsulas and islands
Flat Mountainous
Nile River only fertile land Much fertile land

Transition statement. Good! You have found all the major differences. Now look at the map of Greece again. Since all of Greece is near a sea, how do you think most Greeks traveled. (by boat, raft). Exactly. Now, where do you think most of the Greeks worked and what did they do?

Developmental Activity (5 minutes): List several activities associated with the sea. Fishing, trading, transportation, communications. Discuss very briefly the importance of the sea to each activity.

Transition Statement: Class, we are about out of time so if I could have your attention.

Culminating activity (2-5 minutes) (activity 5). Vocabulary words.


Lesson #2 Ancient Greek Culture
Minos & Mycenae

Lesson Topic: Ancient Greek Culture

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Overhead transparency list of terms.

  7. Maps of, the World, Europe

Lesson Background: This is the second lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the the Early Greek civilizations, and their effect on later Greek civilizations.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, with the help of a graphic organizer, compare the Greek civilizations of Minos, and Mycenae.

  2. The student will be able to describe what a "dark age" is

  3. The student will be able to discuss oral history, its accuracy and reliability, as well as why historians use it today.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. Drill questions: The Mycenaeans built their cities on ___________. Minoan cities included underground plumbing and ______________ and ______________.

  3. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Students take out graphic organizer we were working on last week. We are going to finish this today.

Developmental Activity: Students will fill in with the help of the textbook, the graphic organizer on Mycenae.

Transitional Statement: Please put the graphic organizer in your notebooks. You will need these notes for your Unit Quiz. Now let us turn our attention to the "Greek dark ages". Who can tell me what a "dark age" might be. Have them write their thoughts in their notebooks as an important concept.

Overhead: The Early Greeks

How did geography and climate influence ancient Greece in the following areas?

FARMING

1.

2.

3.

TRADE

1.

2.

3.

How did geography contribute to Greece's development as a group of individual city states?

(The rugged mountains and the many bays divided Greece into small, isolated regions)

What were some of the things the Minoans achieved and the Mycenaeans adopted in these areas? After you fill out the chart, put an X next to the achievements that were lost during the Dark Ages.

AREA MINOAN MYCENAEAN
ART    
TRADE    
BUILDING    
LANGUAGE    

Answer these questions:

  1. When did the Greek city-states develop?

  2. What was the Age of Expansion?

Developmental Activity:

  1. Define Epic, discuss oral history.

  2. Begin reading the Odyssey (the Cyclops cave) as an example of Oral history that was later written down.

Safety Valve: Map Activity, Have students find on a map of Europe then a map of the world, Greece, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Crete, Turkey (Asia Minor). Discuss trade.

Review/Conclusion: Have students give examples, using their graphic organizers of similarities and differences between Minos, and Mycenae.


Ancient Greece: Lesson #3 Athens as a City-State

Lesson Topic: Athens as a City State; introduction of Democracy; introduction to Sparta

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Lesson Objectives:

  • TSWBAT explain the political evolution of the city-state

  • TSWBAT define democracy

  • TSWBAT explain the structure of Athenian society and economy

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Overhead transparency list characteristics of Athens and Sparta.

  7. Overhead transparency Venn Diagram.

Lesson Background: This is the third lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of democracy, and its importance to Athens. It will also touch upon Athenian society and economy.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transition Statement: You have heard many times in your life that we live in a democracy. Have you ever wondered what a democracy really is?

Developmental Activity:

  1. Have students define "Democracy". Write their ideas on a blank transparency.

  2. Have students look up "Democracy" in their textbook. write this definition under their ideas.

  3. Give a dictionary definition of "Democracy" write this under the textbook definition.

  4. Have students compare the three definitions, and discuss their comparisons.

Transition Statement: The Greek city states were among the first practitioners of Democracy. Lets take a look at two of the most famous of the Greek cities.

Developmental Activity:

  1. Have students read aloud the background information on Athens and Sparta. (Teacher will provide additional material). List important notes on each in columns on a blank overhead.

  2. On blank overhead draw a Venn Diagram. Label one section Sparta, label the other outside section Athens, label middle shared section similarities. Have students provide information from the list into each section.

Conclusion: Review with students, democracy, the growth of the City-states, Athens and Sparta


Ancient Greece: Lesson #4 Rise of the City States

Lesson Topic: The rise of the City States in Greece

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Overhead transparency list of terms.

  7. Maps of, the World, Europe

Lesson Background: This is the fourth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of the rise of the city-states in Greek and the development of democracy.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to define democracy.

  2. The student will be able to describe what a "city-state" is

  3. The student will be able to discuss who was able to participate in Athenian democracy.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in. Drill questions:

  • The Minoans & Mycenaeans both spoke ____________

  • During the Dark Ages _________came to a standstill.

2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Today we are going to try an experiment. Today, you will write on the overhead. The first word you will write is Democracy. Who would like to do that?

Developmental Activity: Students will brainstorm ideas on what democracy is. Teacher will write these ideas on a blank overhead. Tell students that we will look at this transparency at the end of the day to see if they might change what they believe a democracy is.

Transitional Statement: Take out your textbooks and open them to page 338. Who would like to begin reading?

Developmental Activity: Have students read page 338, and the 1st paragraph on 339.

Define Democracy, Monarchy, Oligarchy. Have students write down definitions as notes.

Transition Statement: Turn to page 240 in your book.

Developmental Activity: Read Aloud "Understanding Democracy". Discuss with class why they think Athenian democracy can or cannot work in the U.S.

Review/Conclusion: Take out transparency of student ideas on democracy. Discuss with students how they would change this overhead now.


Ancient Greece: Lesson #5 Daily Life

Supplemental Material: For printable information on ancient Greek daily life, for classroom use, see Mrs Donn's Special Section: Daily Life Ancient Greece.

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Overhead transparency list of terms.

  7. Filmstrip on daily life in Athens.

Lesson Background: This is the fifth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the the daily life of the Greeks.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, define democracy

  2. The Student will be able to describe the daily life of a typical Greek citizen.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Yesterday we started a discussion about democracy in ancient Athens, and how it compares to democracy today. We will continue that lesson today, and in addition look at the daily life of a Greek by using the filmstrip. Take out some paper to write down some notes.

Developmental Activity: Show filmstrip, discussing appropriate sections with the students, having them take notes about democracy in Athens, and daily life in Greece.

Safety Valve:

  1. Have students turn to page 343 in their textbook "The economy of Athens."

  2. Have students take notes and discuss the information contained on page 343.


Ancient Greece: Lesson #6 The Olympics and the Gods (1 of 2)

For a complete 3-4 day mini-unit, to supplement this section, and better position the importance of Greek city-states:
Ancient Greek Olympic Games in the Classroom

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Overhead transparency list of terms.

  7. Cutouts on which students will draw symbols. (Manilla folder sheets, cut in various shapes, works well)

Lesson Background: This is the sixth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the the origin of the Olympic games, and Greek mythology.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to define Olympics.

  2. The student will be able to list some events that took place during the Greek Olympics.

  3. The student will be able to discuss the Greek beliefs in Gods and myths.

Olympics Background: In 776 B.C., the Olympic Games were first held in honor of Zeus, through a festival in the Greek city of Olympia. The Olympics were very important to the Greeks. If any of the city states were at war when the Olympics started, the war would stop so that everyone could go to the Olympics. Only men could participate in the Ancient Greek Olympics, and only men could watch, because the participants in the games did not wear clothes.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Yesterday we started a discussion of the life of the greeks. We talked about how Greeks developed coins for trade, and how rich Greeks were expected to pay for government functions. Today we are going to take a closer look at some things the Greeks found important in their lives. In other words we are going to discuss parts of the Greek culture. Take out a textbook and turn to page 345.

Developmental Activity: Students will read aloud p345. Ask students what they know about the Olympics today. With a graphic organizer, compare the original Olympics with modern Olympics.

Transitional Statement: It said in our textbook that the Olympics were held to honor the Gods. The Greeks believed in many Gods.

Developmental Activity: Hand out shapes, and information sheets on the Greek Gods. Have students design a symbol to Represent the God they have been given. Have students work in pairs. Inform them that we will be developing a Greek God family tree. (have students put their names on the backs of their designs. Work on this for the rest of the class. Tell students that we will be introducing a new God or Gods each day next week

Safety Valve:

1. Have students turn to page 344 in their textbook "Comparing Graphs"

Discuss with students the two type graphs shown. have them solve problems using the two type graphs shown using the try it section. Give them information from Towson state, In 1996, 10,000 students. growing to 25,000 by 2000 A.D. In 1996, 1000 students in fraternities, 4000 students living in the dorms, 5000 students commute. If percentages stay the same, how many students will commute in 2000 A.D.

2. Have students turn to page 342 in their textbook and study the graph. Inform them that this is called a bar graph, and it contains the same type information as the pie chart on page 344. See if students can convert the bar graph into a pie chart.


Lesson #7: The Greek Gods, Sanctuaries, and the Olympics (2 of 2)

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Overhead transparency list of terms.

  7. Cutouts for students to draw symbols on.

Lesson Background: This is the seventh lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the the origin of the Olympic games, and Greek mythology.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, define Olympics.

  2. The student will be able to list some events that took place during the Greek Olympics.

  3. The student will be able to compare modern Olympics with Greek Olympics.

  4. The student will be able to discuss the Greek beliefs in Gods and myths.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Last week we ended the week starting to learn a little about the Greek Gods. We will continue with that lesson a little later today. But for now I would like everyone to open their books to p 345.

Developmental Activity: Students will read aloud p345. Ask students what they know about the olympics today. With a graphic organizer, compare the original Olympics with modern Olympics.

Transitional Statement: It said in our textbook that the Olympics were held to honor the Gods. The Greeks believed in many Gods. They believed that the gods controlled every thing in nature, and liked to interfere with men's lives. The reason I had you start drawing a symbol for the God that you were representing is that we are going to build a family tree of Greek Gods. Each of you is going to be given the opportunity to present your symbol and explain to the class why you chose that symbol to represent that God.

We are then going to place them in their correct spot on our Greek God family tree. You will be receiving a grade on your project. The grade will be based on completion of work, appropriateness of your symbol, and your presentation.

Developmental Activity: Hand out shapes, and information sheets on the Greek Gods.

Have students design a symbol to Represent the God they have been given. Have students work in pairs. Inform them that we will be developing a Greek God family tree. (have students put their names on the backs of their designs. Work on this for the rest of the class. Tell students that we will be introducing a new God or Gods each day next week

2. If we have time we will present our first two Gods today.

Safety Valve: Have students turn to page 346 in their textbook "The Family of Greek Gods". Students will read this page aloud.

Greek Gods: The ancient Greeks explained the wonders around them and the happenings in their lives as being the work of the gods. The gods and goddesses looked much like people. However, the gods and goddesses were more beautiful, handsome, clever, and powerful. They not only looked much like people, they acted like people. They had quarrels, played tricks, and were often jealous. Their homes were not the heavens but just the top of mountain in northern Greece - Mount Olympus. The mountain was much too difficult a climb for mere mortals. The Greeks made stories about their gods and goddesses which are called myths. These myths are still read today. Zeus and Hera were the King and Queen of the Greek gods. For a list of Greek gods, click HERE.


Lesson #8 Greek Culture

Lesson Topic: The Greek Gods, Sanctuaries, and Greek Drama

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Cutouts for students to draw symbols on.

Lesson Background: This is the eighth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into Greek Drama and Greek mythology.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to define Tragedy and Comedy.

  2. The student will be able to describe additional Greek Gods.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Yesterday we introduced (worked on symbols for) some Greek Gods. I would like to introduce two (more) to place on our family tree.

Developmental Activity: Two students will present their symbols for Greek Gods.

Transitional Statement: We will continue with our presentations tomorrow. Now everyone open your textbook to page 350, lets look at Greek Drama.

Developmental Activity:

  1. Have students read aloud p350. As notes, define comedy and tragedy. Inform them that these will be tomorrows drill questions.

  2. Discuss why the plays were written.

  3. Compare to modern plays/films/tv shows

Review/Conclusion: Review the Gods we have in our family tree. Review Greek Drama.

Safety Valve: Have students turn to page 346 in their textbook "The Family of Greek Gods". Students will read this page aloud.


Lesson #9 Sparta and Athens (1 of 3)

Prior to comparing Sparta and Athens, we suggest, if time permits, you take 3-4 days to run your own Olympics in the Classroom. This link is also listed above, under Lesson #6: Olympics.
Mr Donn's Ancient Greek Olympics in the Classroom


Lesson Topic: The Greek Gods, Sparta and Athens

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Completed Cutouts with symbols drawn on.

Lesson Background: This is the ninth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the Greek mythology, and the differences between Sparta and Athens.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, describe additional Greek Gods

  2. The student will be able to compare Spartan government with Athenian government.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Yesterday we introduced two more Greek Gods. I would like to introduce two (more) to place on our family tree.

Developmental Activity: Two students will present their symbols for Greek Gods.

Transitional Statement: We will continue with our presentations tomorrow. Now everyone open your textbook to page 351.

Developmental Activity: Begin reading on page 351, Sparta and Athens. Read through page 353. Hand out a Graphic organizer for notes, review what we have learned about Athenian government from page 341.

Review/Conclusion: Review the Gods we have in our family tree. Review Athenian Government vs. Spartan Government.

Safety Valve: Have students turn to page 354 in their textbook "Growing up in Sparta and Athens". Students will read this page aloud reading each age group for both Sparta and Athens. The students will take notes and place them on a graphic organizer.

Worksheet Assignment:

Compare life in Athens with life in Sparta

ATHENS   SPARTA
  physical education  
  cultural education  
  military obligations of citizens  
  form of government  
  government control of daily life  

Lesson #10 Sparta and Athens (2 of 3)

Lesson Topic: The Greek Gods, Sparta and Athens

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Completed Cutouts with symbols drawn on.

Lesson Background: This is the tenth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into Greek mythology, and the differences between Sparta and Athens.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, describe additional Greek Gods

  2. The student will be able to compare Spartan education with Athenian education.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Yesterday we introduced two more Greek Gods. I would like to introduce two (more) to place on our family tree.

Developmental Activity: Two students will present their symbols for Greek Gods.

Transitional Statement: We will continue with our presentations tomorrow. Now everyone open your textbook to page 353.

Developmental Activity: Begin reading on page 353, Sparta and Athens. Read through page 355. Have students take out Graphic organizer from yesterday for notes

Review/Conclusion: Review the Gods we have in our family tree. Review Athenian education vs. Spartan education.

Safety Valve: Have students turn to page 354 in their textbook "Growing up in Sparta and Athens". Students will read this page aloud reading each age group for both Sparta and Athens. The students will take notes and place them on a graphic organizer.


Lesson #11 Sparta and Athens (3 of 3)

Lesson Topic: The Greek Gods, Sparta and Athens

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Completed Cutouts with symbols drawn on.

Lesson Background: This is the twelfth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into Greek mythology, the differences between Sparta and Athens, and the Persian Wars.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, describe additional Greek Gods

  2. The student will be able to compare Spartan training with Athenian training.

  3. The student will be able to list several causes for the Persian Wars

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Yesterday we introduced two more Greek Gods. I would like to introduce two (more) to place on our family tree.

Developmental Activity: Two students will present their symbols for Greek Gods.

Transitional Statement: We will continue with our presentations tomorrow. Now everyone open your textbook to page 353.

Developmental Activity: Begin reading on page 353, Sparta and Athens. Read through page 355. Have students take out Graphic organizer from yesterday for notes

Review/Conclusion: Review the Gods we have in our family tree. Review Athenian education vs. Spartan education. Review with students; Olympics, government, and daily living in Greece.

Safety Valve: Have students turn to page 354 in their textbook "Growing up in Sparta and Athens". Students will read this page aloud reading each age group for both Sparta and Athens. The students will take notes and place them on a graphic organizer.


Lesson #12 The Greek Gods

Lesson Topic: The Greek Gods

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Completed Cutouts with symbols drawn on.

Lesson Background: This is the Thirteenth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into Greek mythology.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, describe additional Greek Gods

  2. The Student will be able to finish presentations on Greek Gods.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Last week, we introduced several Greek Gods. I would like to introduce two (more) to place on our family tree.

Developmental Activity: Two students will present their symbols for Greek Gods.

Transitional Statement: We will continue with our presentations tomorrow. Now everyone let us have a little fun today. I need an artist. (Select one or two students to draw a family tree using handout as a model. We are going to place our symbols on the family tree. I would like everyone to finish and color in your symbol today. You may take the rest of the class to do so. I am going to place this tree up on the back bulletin board so do a good job.

Developmental Activity: Have students finish coloring in symbols.

Review/Conclusion: Review the Gods we have in our family tree.

Safety Valve: Have students turn to page 355 in their textbook. Students will read this page aloud. The students will take notes.


Lesson #13 The Persian Wars (1 of 3)

Lesson Topic: The Persian Wars.

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

Lesson Background: This is the Fourteenth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the Persian Wars.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, list the causes for the Persian Wars

  2. The Student will be able to describe the major phases of the Persian wars.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: So far we have just talked about Greece. Today I would like to move into the area of foreign affairs.

Developmental Activity: Students will work silently with partners to fill in the graphic organizer using pages 355 and 356 in their text. Advise students that they will be writing an assessment of the wars from the information that they gather and put on their graphic organizer. Have them work for 20 minutes, then return to their seats.

Transition: Have students break into pairs, reminding them that I have the option of breaking up a pair if they are not working.

Developmental activity: Review with students their assessment of the, causes of the, and the results of the Persian Wars.

Zerk the Jerk

As part of this discussion, to introduce the third and final major battle, the Battle of Salamis, as most students will have wandering interest at that point, and most probably will not have reviewed this important battle - introduce Xerxes, the Persian King, as Zerk the Jerk. Xerxes (pronounced Zerkzes) easily becomes Zerk the Jerk.

Talk about how Zerk the Jerk had his slaves carry his golden throne from Persia and set it up on a hillside so he could watch the Greeks be destroyed. The Greeks were greatly outnumbered, and the Persians had huge ships compared to the Greeks. But the Greeks surprised him. Their small ships could maneuver better. The Persians were caught on their ships, and destroyed. Zerk the Jerk ran away, leaving his army behind. Sparta marched north at full strength and defeated the Persian army. The Greeks took the day! Zerk the Jerk ran away. The Persian threat to Greece was ended!


Lesson #14 The Persian Wars (2 of 3)

Lesson Topic: The Persian Wars.

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Graphic Organizer

Lesson Background: This is the 15th lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the Persian Wars.

Objectives:

  1. The Student will be able to, complete their list of the four main battles of the Persian Wars

  2. The Student will copy the rubric for their Persian War assessment.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Last week you worked on a graphic organizer for the Persian Wars. Now that you have the information, you need to do something with it. You are going to write a paper explaining the Persian Wars.

Developmental Activity: Hand out the Rubric for writing the Assessment. Go over in class. Ensure all students understand.

Transition: Hand out copy of writing rubric. Tell students, We have finished with chapter 11. What usually happens when we finish a chapter? We are going to have a test. To get you ready for the test we are going to have a little review.

Review: Use flash cards, and break up into teams.

Writing Assessment Rubric: Using your graphic organizer, you will write a paper about the Persian Wars. This paper will include:

1. An introduction paragraph which will also include the causes of the Persian Wars.

2. Three additional paragraphs each of which will discuss one of the following battles.

  • Marathon

  • Thermopalyle

  • Salimis

3. Each of the paragraphs discussing the three battles will include:

  • Who is involved

  • Where was it fought

  • When was it fought

  • What happened.

  • Who won.

  • Details of the battle if known.

4. A conclusion paragraph.

This assessment is due (due date)


Lesson #15 The Persian Wars (3 of 3)

Lesson Topic: The Persian Wars.

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Graphic Organizer

Lesson Background: This is the Sixteenth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the Persian Wars.

Objectives: The student will be able to write an assessment of the Persian wars following a rubric.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity: Yesterday you were working on gathering information for a graphic organizer. Today we are going to use those graphic organizers again. Take out the graphic organizer, paper to write on, and something to write with.

Developmental Activity: Give students copies of the Rubric. Have students write a paper using the information from their graphic organizer, and following the format from the Rubric. Have them finish as homework.

Rubric: Write a paper on the Persian War containing at least 5 short paragraphs.

  • Each paragraph is worth 1 letter grade

  • Style and proper writing (mechanics) is worth 1 letter grade

  • 5 = A, 4 = B, 3 = C, 2 = D, 1 = E, 0 = F

The Paragraphs should correspond to the following:

1. Introduce the war by writing about the causes (more then one) for the war.

2. Explain the Battle of Marathon including:

a. Who is fighting

b. Where are they fighting

c. Who was the winner


3. Explain the battle of Thermoplyae including:

a. Who is fighting

b. Where are they fighting

c. Who won, and how


4. Explain the battle of Salamis including:

a. Who is fighting

b. Where are they fighting

c. Who won and how did they win?


5. Explain the battle of Plataea:

a. Who is fighting

b. Who won

Additional information/research can be used to raise a mark with the exception of "A" papers.

Do not copy directly out of the book, but rewrite using your own words.



Lesson #16 Early Greek Unit Review


Lesson Topic: Ancient Greece Review

Type of Lesson: Developmental

Materials:

  1. Notebook/Paper

  2. Textbook

  3. Pencil/Pen

  4. Blackboard/Chalk

  5. Overhead projector

  6. Graphic Organizer

  7. Filmstrip and Filmstrip projector.

  8. Handout with filmstrip questions

  9. Handout with textbook review questions.

Lesson Background: This is the Seventeenth lesson of a unit on Ancient Greece. This lesson will develop the students understanding of cultural diversity. It will also delve into the Persian Wars.

Objectives: The student will review using a filmstrip and textbook.

Lesson Procedures:

Motivation/Recall: (10 minutes)

  1. Students will copy today's drill questions on their drill sheets for turn in.

  2. A selected student will read aloud today's Objectives from the blackboard.

Transitional activity:

  1. Last week you completed a writing assessment of the Persian Wars. I would like to return those papers now. (have selected students pass out papers.

  2. Second, we will be going on the field trip tomorrow (at least some of you are). We will be having a special lesson tomorrow, as well as some additional review. Finally, I want to remind you that we will be having a test Thursday. We will be reviewing the material we have covered in two ways. First we will watch a film strip answering some questions. Then we will use the Review questions I have ready for you.

Developmental Activity: Have students view filmstrip on ancient Greece, answering questions as we go. Be sure and ask (and label stance questions from MSPP).

Transition: Keep these answer sheets to review with. The questions on this review will probably show up on a test somewhere. As we answer these questions, I would like you to take notes, I will be pretty specific so it would be a good idea to write down what I am telling you. Again we will probably see some of these questions on the test.

Developmental activity: Review with students questions drawn up from the test.

Safety Valve: Team questions, winning team is exempt from the drill tomorrow.


QUIZ
PERSIAN WARS


I. Define:

Polis

Demos

Patriotism

Phalanx

Prophecy

II. Place the following terms under the battle with which each belongs.

  • 490 BC

  • phalanx

  • 150,000

  • Strait

  • Darius

  • Greeks won

  • Persians won

  • triremes

  • 4,000

  • a pass

  • Athens burns

  • Xerxes

  • Miltiades

  • Thermistocles

  • rowers

Marathon Thermopylae Salamis
     
     
     
     
     

III Essay (on back). Because you will be asked to change the outcome of the Persian War, you will need to know more about

  • the leaders

  • strategies

  • plans

  • results

  • details

Think about how the Persians could have won the war? What details of the battle would be different? How might Greek and Roman history have been affected?


Greek Vocabulary List


  1. epic - a long poem that tells the story of a hero

  2. barbarians - the name given by the Greeks to any people who were not Greek

  3. colonies - areas set up in conquered lands by the Greek city states for use when they themselves became overpopulated

  4. Minoan (min-o-un) - an ancient Cretan civilization

  5. myths - legends or stories that attempt to explain natural events

  6. Dorians - a group that invaded Greece around 1000 B.C.

  7. Hellenes - the name the Dorians gave themselves

  8. Acropolis - a hilltop fortress in Ancient Athens which included the Parthenon and other famous buildings where citizens met to discuss affairs of the community

  9. agora - the central marketplace in Ancient Athens and the site of numerous temples and government buildings

  10. mattock - a heavy hoe which was the chief tool of Greek farmers

  11. drama - a serious play or theatrical event

  12. metics - a class of people in Athens who were not citizens

  13. Helots - one of the Spartan slave classes

  14. city-state - a self governing unit made up of a city and its surrounding villages and farmland

  15. Homer - a Greek epic poet and author of the Iliad and Odyssey

  16. monarchy - a system of government in which a monarch - a king, queen, or emperor is the sole and absolute ruler

  17. oligarchy - a system of government in which a few people rule

  18. democracy - a system of government in which the people rule, either directly or through elected representatives

  19. tyrant - a ruler who has absolute power (not limited by a constitution or by other officials)

  20. polis - a city-state in Ancient Greece

  21. trireme - a major sailing vessel powered by three banks of oarsmen

  22. fresco - a painting done on fresh plaster with water colors

  23. Peloponnesus - a hilly major peninsula in Greece

  24. ostracized - shunned, avoided

  25. oracle - places where the gods spoke directly to man

  26. phalanx - special Greek battle formation where soldiers formed rows, closely pressed together

  27. philosophy - the study of the meaning and knowledge of life

  28. Sophocles - a famous Greek writer

  29. Pericles - a Greek leader of the Golden Age

  30. Ionia - a group of Greek cities on the coast of Asia Minor


List of Greek Gods

Go here for a pronunciation guide and a brief description of the ancient Greek deities!


  1. Zeus was the most powerful of the gods. Should he have to bring order, he would hurl a thunderbolt. Zeus shared his powers and ruled with other great gods.

  2. Hera was the wife of Zeus, and thus, the Queen. Hera was the goddess of marriage, children, and the home

  3. Poseidon, the lord of the sea, was the brother of Zeus

  4. Hades, another brother of Zeus, was lord of the dead.

  5. Ares, Zeus' son, was the god of war. He tall and handsome but cruel and vain. Ares could not bear to suffer pain.

  6. Hephaestus, god of fire, often made metal tools and weapons to aid the gods and some fortunate mortals.

  7. Hermes was Zeus' son and the messenger of the gods. Hermes was noted for his pranks as well as for his speed. (pronounced hur'-meez)

  8. Apollo was Zeus' son and god of the sun, light and music.

  9. Artemis was goddess of the hunt

  10. Dionysus was the god of wine.

  11. Athena, for whom Athens was named, was the goddess of wisdom.

  12. Aphrodite was the goddess of love and beauty

  13. Eros was the god of love. He had a bow and arrow to shoot people and make them fall in love.

  14. Dionysus was the god of life, hospitality, and wild things

  15. Pan was half man, half goat, and the god of all nature. He was also the protector of shepherds and their flocks

  16. Hercules was another of Zeus' sons. He was half man, half god, and very strong.

  17. Centaur was half man, half horse, and tried to steal Hercules' wife.

  18. Pegasus was a winged horse

  19. Cerberus was the three-headed dog that guards the entrance to the underworld.

  20. The Muses were daughters of Zeus. They made such beautiful music with their singing that it brought joy to everyone who heard them.


EARLY GREEKS - UNIT TEST


I. Matching - Match the words in column A with their definitions in column B. Write the letter from column "B" in the matching space in front of the word in column "A"

Column A Column B
____1. democracy a. a king rules the country
____2. monarchy b. everyone participates in the government
____3. oligarchy c. a few people hold power over the country
____4. tyranny d. a single ruler, who seized power forcefully

II. True or False. Read each statement carefully. Write out true or false in the blank.

1. ______ Sparta was ruled by an oligarchy during most of its history.

2. ______ Education in Sparta consisted mostly of art and music.

3. ______ Life in Athens and Sparta was the same for everyone including women and slaves.

4. ______ Spartans and Athenians both kept slaves.

5. ______ A tragedy was a type of Greek play that made fun of the gods or famous men.


III. Multiple Choice. Place the letter of the Best Answer in the blank.


____1. This army was defeated by the Athenians at Marathon.

a. Salamis

b. Persia

c. Macedonia

d. Rome


____2. What is not required for a citizen of Athens.

a. be male

b. be over 18

c. fight in a war

d. have a father who was a citizen


____3. In Sparta, which was not a physical skill.

a. running.

b. jumping

c. ice skating

d. wrestling


____4. Who won the battle of Thermopylae?

a. Athens

b. Sparta

c. Persia

d. Macedonia


____5. In Greece, a prediction or the name of the place where a prediction was told.

a. Athens

b. Eleusis

c. Olympus

d. oracle


IV. Matching - Match the words in column A with their definitions in column B.

Column A Column B
____1. Zeus a. Goddess of marriage
____2. Hera b. God of the Sea
____3. Ares c. Father or Head of the Greek Gods
____4. Poseidon d. God of light and health
____5. Apollo e. God of War

V. True or False - Write true or false in the space provided.

____1. Only those Greeks who lived in Athens worshipped Zeus

____2. Mt. Olympus was supposed to be the home of the Gods.

____3. Athletes were often killed in war on their way to the Olympics

____4. Xerxes watched his ships be destroyed at Salamis

____5. The Spartan army ran away at the battle of Thermopylae.


VI. Multiple choice - Choose the most correct answer.


1. The only occupation a man could have in Sparta.

a. trader

b. farmer

c. actor

d. soldier


2. A battle where the Persians were defeated, and the name of a 26 mile race.

a. Marathon

b. Plataea

c. Salamis

d. Thermopylae


3. Who could be a Citizen in Athens.

a. a slave

b. a woman

c. a metic

d. a male


4. The type of Greek play where a man was brought down by a flaw in his character.

a. comedy

b. tragedy

c. mystery

d. horror


5. The Minoans built elaborate palaces that contained what.

a. running water

b. indoor plumbing

c. elaborate mazes

d. all the above


VII. Fill in the blank. Write in the word from the word bank that best completes the statement. Use only words from the word bank. A word can be used once, more then once or not at all.


1. __________ were independent, self governing units.


2. Sparta's emphasis was on a strong __________ ?


3. __________ had the most successful democracy


4. __________ and Athens were the two biggest city-states


5. __________ was the site of the festival that centered around sports, and honored Zeus.


Word Bank:

Athens

Sparta

Olympia

city-states

army

navy

Delphi

democracy